Tourism and Property Values Considered by Our Neighbor NH

Some excerpts:

  • “I do not believe the Applicant has met the burden of proof that there will be no impact on tourism. I’m not sure I know one way or the other. I was critical of the methodology and findings. I did not find them to be particularly adequate or convincing. I did not find the witness to be particularly knowledgeable about the state, its tourist destinations, and I didn’t feel there was an adequate outreach to attempt to fill that gap.”
  • “Impact to property values. In the same vein, I’m not sure I accept the argument that there will be no impact to property values. It just doesn’t make sense to me that there won’t be any. But once again, if we sort of wash it into a region, I guess that’s the statement that can be made. But I just don’t think it passes the “straight-face test” that there will be none. I think we’ve heard some good testimony to suggest that it could be just the opposite.”
  • I am not convinced that the construction phase of this project would not have an impact on tourism and the economy.”
  • “I guess one last comment on tourism. I don’t feel that we have in front of us at this point in time an analysis of what the construction phase of this project would or would not have on tourism. I feel that this is an oversight by the Applicant and their experts.”
  • “Concerning tourism, I also believe the Applicant didn’t demonstrate that there will not be undue interference to tourism from this project either during construction, and particularly over the long term. The analysis by Mr. Nichols was deficient in many respects, and I was left unpersuaded that New Hampshire tourism will not be unduly influenced in a negative manner.”
  • “I agree with Mr. Way’s assessment of the impacts on tourism. I believe there will be an impact on tourism.”
  • “Tourism.  Again, I didn’t find the witness credible for a number of reasons that have already been stated by others.”
  • In terms of property values, I agree with a lot of what was said by the Subcommittee over the last day or so. I did not find the analysis credible or convincing, and I do have concern about this project’s impact on property values.”
  • “I do believe, as the other folks have stated, that the property values will be impacted in a negative way and that land use, especially up north, would be impacted.”
  • “With respect to property values, I don’t believe that the Applicant has met its burden to demonstrate that there will not be an impact on property value.

http://indepthnh.org/2018/02/11/opinion-the-sec-decision-to-deny-no...

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Comment by Deborah Andrew on February 11, 2018 at 1:45pm

There is an expert witness when property values are an issue, and thay are definitely affected by industrial wind turbines:  Michael McCann, McCann Appraisal LLC, 500 N. Michigan Ave, Suite 600, Chicago, IL 606011 - mikemccann@comcast.not ... he has testified numerous times, and done thorough studies.

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Maine Center For Public Interest Reporting – Three Part Series: A CRITICAL LOOK AT MAINE’S WIND ACT (excerpts) From Part 1 – On Maine’s Wind Law “Once the committee passed the wind energy bill on to the full House and Senate, lawmakers there didn’t even debate it. They passed it unanimously and with no discussion. House Majority Leader Hannah Pingree, a Democrat from North Haven, says legislators probably didn’t know how many turbines would be constructed in Maine if the law’s goals were met." . – Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting, August 2010  http://www.pinetreewatchdog.org/wind-power-bandwagon-hits-bumps-in-the-road-3/From Part 2 – On Wind and Oil Yet using wind energy doesn’t lower dependence on imported foreign oil. That’s because the majority of imported oil in Maine is used for heating and transportation. And switching our dependence from foreign oil to Maine-produced electricity isn’t likely to happen very soon, says Bartlett. “Right now, people can’t switch to electric cars and heating – if they did, we’d be in trouble.” So was one of the fundamental premises of the task force false, or at least misleading?"  http://www.pinetreewatchdog.org/wind-swept-task-force-set-the-rules/From Part 3 – On Wind-Required New Transmission Lines Finally, the building of enormous, high-voltage transmission lines that the regional electricity system operator says are required to move substantial amounts of wind power to markets south of Maine was never even discussed by the task force – an omission that Mills said will come to haunt the state.“If you try to put 2,500 or 3,000 megawatts in northern or eastern Maine – oh, my god, try to build the transmission!” said Mills. “It’s not just the towers, it’s the lines – that’s when I begin to think that the goal is a little farfetched.” http://www.pinetreewatchdog.org/flaws-in-bill-like-skating-with-dull-skates/

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