Hydro Quebec: Hydro project will benefit Maine

8/4/18 - At the end of this post from 7/31/18, there are some new and interesting comments worth a read.

Over the past 15 years, Maine’s partner to the north has been preparing for increased clean energy needs by building new power plants — enough to supply roughly five million New England homes — and is in the process of making its existing ones more efficient. Thanks to this approach, Hydro-Québec has clean energy ready for its neighbours today..............................

Lynn St-Laurent

Hydro Quebec

strategic communications advisor

public affairs and media relations

Montréal

Read thew full letter here: https://www.centralmaine.com/2018/07/29/hydro-quebec-cmp-project-wi...

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

BDN - Project to import Canadian hydropower through Maine faces final review

The contracts with the Massachusetts electric distribution companies would deliver about 9.45 terawatt hours annually of clean, reliable, baseload power for 20 years, according to Hydro-Quebec and CMP.

The paperwork submitted July 23 gives a total levelized price (average price over the project’s lifetime) of 5.9 cents/kilowatt hour.

Read the full article here: 

https://bangordailynews.com/2018/07/29/business/mass-firms-planning...

Views: 166

Comment

You need to be a member of Citizens' Task Force on Wind Power - Maine to add comments!

Join Citizens' Task Force on Wind Power - Maine

Comment by Art Brigades on August 4, 2018 at 8:34am

I fully understand the NECEC opposition coming from the rafting community and others along the Old Canada Road corridor from Skowhegan to Jackman. The Arnold Trail, The Forks, the Kennebec gorge, the Appalachian Trail… it’s all integral to Maine’s signature Quality of Place and worth protecting against encroachment by 120' tall power lines.

In a perfect world, Massachusetts would host its own electricity generation (they just closed a nuke), but this power plantation game has been played for over 100 years (see Walter Wyman, Percy Baxter, Flagstaff Lake & the Fernald Law) and it isn’t likely to change. For decades a major exporter of electricity, even Maine is now a net importer. 

Electricity does not and will not be confined by borders. So which electricity do we choose?
The sprawling Kibby Wind project sailed through the permitting process with minor opposition despite its massive impact on huge Maine wildlands. There was ONE opponent of the Bingham Wind Project, which planted 500' tall turbines at high elevation/visibility over a 16 mile stretch AND many more miles of power lines all the way to Parkman. Both of these “clean energy” projects harm water and wildlife over thousands of acres and they violate the scenic experience along pretty much all of Maine’s 280 miles of Appalachian Trail, not merely 200 yards across the Kennebec gorge. 
Where were all the righteous defenders of the wilderness when Bingham and Kibby were built for Massachusetts utilities?  
At 185 MegaWatts nameplate, performing at a generous 30% capacity factor, it would require 20 Bingham projects to (unpredictably) equal the MegaWattHours provided by the NECEC. It would take 30 Kibby projects or 100 Mars Hill projects. 
Where would we choose to erect those thousands of flashing-thumping skyscrapers, the necessary transmission lines, and the expensive/dirty capacity plants that would still be required to make the wind turbines useful for the New England grid?
Comment by Dan McKay on July 30, 2018 at 6:37pm

Hydro-Quebec will receive compensation, by contract with a Massachusetts' utility, for every kilowatt they send into the power-line into Maine. Massachusetts' ratepayers receiving their power from this utility are committed to make this payment to H-Q. The same Massachusetts' ratepayers are also committed by contract to pay for construction, operation and maintenance of the power line into Maine for twenty years.

H-Q can offer by bid, a lower price into the day ahead and real time ISO-NE market ( the prices that every other electric customer in New England with the exception of the contracted Mass. utility will pay) 
Massachusetts' utility customers will pay the higher contracted price to H-Q and CMP and Maine customers will pay according to ISO-NE price offers.
The markets are rigged to make clean energy more expensive to those willing to listen to their corrupt government that places premiums on such energy and mandates utilities operating within their State to buy it and pass costs onto ratepayers,
ISO-NE is a distorted market because of Massachusetts' dumb state policies.
Maine doesn't need ISO-NE with a state like Mass. manipulating the types of power producers it is willing to deal with. 
Comment by Stephen Littlefield on July 30, 2018 at 7:56am

Reliable, that's the bottom line with this, that is what neither wind nor solar can claim! Wind is killing Maine with higher prices for electricity and no ability to take any of the older systems of line because of winds erratic minimal production of electricity! Not saying this is a great deal, just saying dependable green electricity is only going to happen when the state embraces the new hydro option!

First Prize

NE Book Festival

 

Maine as Third World Country:

CMP Transmission Rate Skyrockets 19.6% Due to Wind Power

 

Click here to read how the Maine ratepayer has been sold down the river by the Angus King cabal.

Maine Center For Public Interest Reporting – Three Part Series: A CRITICAL LOOK AT MAINE’S WIND ACT (excerpts) From Part 1 – On Maine’s Wind Law “Once the committee passed the wind energy bill on to the full House and Senate, lawmakers there didn’t even debate it. They passed it unanimously and with no discussion. House Majority Leader Hannah Pingree, a Democrat from North Haven, says legislators probably didn’t know how many turbines would be constructed in Maine if the law’s goals were met." . – Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting, August 2010  http://www.pinetreewatchdog.org/wind-power-bandwagon-hits-bumps-in-the-road-3/From Part 2 – On Wind and Oil Yet using wind energy doesn’t lower dependence on imported foreign oil. That’s because the majority of imported oil in Maine is used for heating and transportation. And switching our dependence from foreign oil to Maine-produced electricity isn’t likely to happen very soon, says Bartlett. “Right now, people can’t switch to electric cars and heating – if they did, we’d be in trouble.” So was one of the fundamental premises of the task force false, or at least misleading?"  http://www.pinetreewatchdog.org/wind-swept-task-force-set-the-rules/From Part 3 – On Wind-Required New Transmission Lines Finally, the building of enormous, high-voltage transmission lines that the regional electricity system operator says are required to move substantial amounts of wind power to markets south of Maine was never even discussed by the task force – an omission that Mills said will come to haunt the state.“If you try to put 2,500 or 3,000 megawatts in northern or eastern Maine – oh, my god, try to build the transmission!” said Mills. “It’s not just the towers, it’s the lines – that’s when I begin to think that the goal is a little farfetched.” http://www.pinetreewatchdog.org/flaws-in-bill-like-skating-with-dull-skates/

Not yet a member?

Sign up today and lend your voice and presence to the steadily rising tide that will soon sweep the scourge of useless and wretched turbines from our beloved Maine countryside. For many of us, our little pieces of paradise have been hard won. Did the carpetbaggers think they could simply steal them from us?

We have the facts on our side. We have the truth on our side. All we need now is YOU.

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.”

 -- Mahatma Gandhi

"It's not whether you get knocked down: it's whether you get up."
Vince Lombardi 

Task Force membership is free. Please sign up today!

© 2018   Created by Eben Thurston.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service